JLatest

JLatest

Contents
Introduction
1 Verbal aptitude
Test 1: General verbal aptitude test
Test 2: Word meanings test
Test 3: Grammar and comprehension
Test 4: Advanced verbal aptitude test
2 Spatial aptitude
Test 1: General spatial aptitude test
Test 2: Logical analysis test
Test 3: Advanced matrix test
3 Numerical aptitude
Test 1: Mental arithmetic
Test 2: Numerical sequence test
Test 3: Working with numbers
Test 4: Numerical problem solving
4 IQ tests
IQ test one
IQ test two
IQ test three
IQ test four
5 Answers, explanations and assessments
A
Introduction




n aptitude test is, generally, any test designed to measure
potential for achievement.
The word aptitude is sometimes misused to mean ‘ability’ or
‘achievement’; however, there is a subtle difference between the
three words aptitude, ability and achievement, which can be
distinguished as follows:
aptitude – how quickly or easily you will be able to learn in the
future;
ability – what you are able to demonstrate in the present;
achievement – what you have accomplished in the past.
There are nine different types of aptitude, which may be summarized
as follows:
General learning: learning and understanding, reasoning and
making judgements. Example: how well we achieve at
school.
Verbal aptitude: general lexical skills – understanding words
and using them effectively.
Numerical aptitude: general mathematical skills – working
with numbers quickly and accurately.
Spatial aptitude: understanding geometric forms, and the
understanding and identification of patterns and their
meaning. Example: understanding how to construct a flat-
pack piece of furniture from a set of instructions.
Form perception: inspecting and perceiving details in objects,
and making visual comparisons between shapes. Examples:
studying an object under a microscope, and quality inspection
of goods.
Clerical perception: reading, analysing and obtaining details
from written data or tabulated material. Examples: proof-
reading, analysing reports and understanding graphs.
Motor coordination: eye and hand coordination, and making
quick and accurate rapid movement responses. Examples:
actually being able to assemble the flat-pack piece of
furniture once you have understood how it should be done,
being able to operate a computer keyboard quickly and
accurately, and sporting skills.
Finger dexterity: manipulating small objects quickly and
accurately. Examples: playing a musical instrument, and
sewing.
Manual dexterity: the skill of being able to work with your
hands. Examples: painting and decorating, building things
and operating machinery.
In the case of most aptitude tests there is usually a set time limit,
which must be strictly adhered to in order for the test to be valid, and